Review of The People of Sparks

People of SparksIt is strongly recommended you read The City of Ember first before you start this one. The People of Sparks follows what happens right after The City of Ember and it is the second book in the Ember series.

The People of Sparks, continues after Doon and Lina leave Ember and arrive above the surface to find a whole new different area for them to explore and to learn about. They arrive upon the small village of Sparks, where they agree to help the people of Ember for a while until the Emberites themselves are ready to start life on their own. Although the happiness was short lived. Differences between the two groups suddenly started to appear, and it wasn’t until certain events started to fuel the tension between the two, and conflict starts to arise. Some of them want the Emberites out of their village, whereas those from Ember demand better food, and demand better treatment. When tensions really mount and there is talk of war, Lina and Doon try their best to avoid a full scale conflict.

Compared with the City of Ember, I actually preferred this book a lot more. It was very interesting, and engaging. The plot was very well written and I found myself wanting to get back to the book. The plot divides the story into two perspectives; Doon’s point of view and also Lina’s point of view (most of the time). You do have some chapters where it features other secondary characters, but the story really focuses on the two main ones. I like both Lina and Doon. They’re still the same as in the first book; strong, individualstic and willing to stand out to do what’s right in their opinion despite what the majority might say. I was afraid for a moment that Doon might have changed for the worst, especially when he was following Tick around (a suitable name for a character, as Tick is quite annoying just like the insect). However, I was wrong, and was glad Doon did not waver and did not change – in fact he did change, but for the better.

Both Tick and Torren should be best friends in my opinion. They were horrible, obnoxious, annoying, and brought the worst out from both the people of Ember and Sparks. I had the feeling I wouldn’t like Torren from the start (and I was right) and although I had my suspicions about Tick, they were finally correct in the end and I felt like slugging them both with a baseball bat. I’m not sure what to say about Caspar. He’s rather odd and I’m curious as to what he’s really looking for, and what do numbers have to do with it.

There were still a lot of questions left to be answered I think, and there’s a few loose ends still not tied. However I heard the third book in the series is like a prequel. Which I find rather odd but perhaps it’ll provide the answers or information that might help to understand the series more.

Overall, a much better improvement and a much more exciting book than the first one. This is a great sequel and it does provide a moral at the end of the story. The ending was great and although there was no cliffhanger, nevertheless it was certainly a very nice way to close the book.

I give it a 9 out of 10.

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2 thoughts on “Review of The People of Sparks

  1. I never heard of this book before, and it sounds very good. Too bad that you couldn’t find much answers in this book, but maybe the third is better and allot more explained. 🙂

    Great review.

  2. Jan says:

    I liked People of Sparks better than City of Ember too. I especially liked the theme that in order to avoid destruction, people must turn away from revenge, and be courageous enough to not indulge in pay back, but to find something good to give instead.

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